elvira

ELVIRA MADIGAN (THE SMOKE OF MY BODY IS YVES KLEIN BLUE) PART THREE OF THE DEAD WOMEN AND HORSES TURN INTO SMOKE TRILOGY from SECRET SAUNA SIRENS on Vimeo.

FONLAD

FONLAD
Thank you to the Fonlad Festival and the Web Art Center in Portugal and to Magmart Videoart in Naples and the Casoria Contemporary Art Museum for presenting and archiving several of my sound and video installations.

les instants

les instants
I'm premiering new work at the 28th Festival Les Instants Vidéo 2015 in Marseille (Friche La Belle de Mai, Espace Culture, ADPEI, SARA, La Fraternité) from November 6-11, and in Milan ( [.BOX] Galerie) from November 6-20. Thank you to Marc Mercier, Direction Artistique: Instants Vidéo Numériques et Poétiques. XO.

les instants texts

Le festival à Marseille en quelques dates :
– le 6 : soirée d’inauguration de 17h à 24h
– du 6 au 11 : les rencontres internationales (exposition, performances & installations, présence d’artistes, temps d’échanges etc) de 14h à 24h
– du 6 au 29 : exposition d’installations vidéo et numériques

ADPEI (18 boulevard Camille Flammarion) du 5 au 27 novembre
SARA (41 Bd de la fédération) du 5 au 27 novembre
Fraternité Belle de Mai (5 boulevard Burel) le 9 novembre
Vitrine de l’Espace Culture (42 La Cannebière) du 24 octobre au 29 novembre.

shedhalle

shedhalle

shedhalle text

Very happy to be participating and exhibiting in the 2015 Shedhalle Generate! Festival, workshop series, and performance program. Please do come see the extraordinary (former abattoir) space and some interesting work/discussions. XO.


“This year, Shedhalle addresses contemporary tendencies of art that are based on the use of electronic media as well as on the application of digital technologies. Generate! Is especially interested in the interrelations between art, research, and technology. A special focus is put on works that are dedicated to generative processes of production and to algorithmically controlled outputs. This also includes their underlying concepts. Likewise, our program takes an interest in works that were made in the context of science and humanities, and that reflect on the aesthetic value of their results and formation. We intend to enable a discourse regarding the aesthetic, sociopolitical, and economic effects that are caused by media and information technology of the 21st century.”


Shedhalle Tübingen - Forum für zeitgenössische Künste

Schlachthausstraße 13

72074 Tübingen

Germany

PROYECTOR

PROYECTOR
Really honored to be one of 30 artists chosen from 614 for the 8th International Proyector Audio-Video Art Festival(s). Please come see me in September (and throughout Europe in subsequent months). I'll be the friendly phantom wearing a cowboy hat in the back row. Xoxo. #Spain #Mexico #Germany #Portugal #France #Italy

proyector

proyector

proy 3

proy 3

pryector



PROYECTOR 2015. 8º Festival Internacional de Videoarte

10-20 SEP 2015. Madrid (esp), Coimbra (por), Milán (ita) y Oaxaca (mex)



Director: Mario Gutiérrez Cru
Coordina: Clara Leitão

En esta convocatoria se presentaron 614 propuestas de videoarte (monocanal, multicanal, videodanza, videoperformance, videoinstalaciones, videointeracción, videomapping... ) y se han seleccionado 27 proyectos. Mantiene la apuesta de ser un festival multi-sede e internacional.


Tras meses de visionado el jurado de PROYECTOR compuesto por Sergio Gomes, Mario Gutiérrez Cru, María Jáñez Álvarez y Clara Leitão han seleccionado de las 614 piezas presentadas de 19 países:

Vanane Borian (arm), Azul y Lindy Márquez (col), Jorge Pellicer y Johnatan Molina (mex), Alberto Díaz (esp), Tara Mahapatra (ale), Christoph Oertli (sui), Gustavo Gutiérrez (col), Juan Caunedo Domínguez (esp), Javiera Tejerina-Risso (fra-chi), Gabriele Stellbaum (ale), Eduardo Restrepo Castaño (col), Joshua Chacón Vega (mex), Paula Bruna (esp), Marte Kiessling (ale), Roman Gomes (arg), Johanna Reich (ale), Dominik Ritszel (pol), Melancholy Maaret (fin-fra-eeuu), Daniel Djamo (rum), Miguel Andrés (esp), Jorge Catoni (chi), doriandgrey (esp), Shahar Tuchner (isr), Richard Bailey (eeuu), Marina Camargo (bra), Natalia Valencia Delgado (col), Rosie Morris and Sam Grant (ing).

Además contaremos con el Artista Seminal Hans Breder (ale, 1935), ofrecido por la galería THEREDOOM, para su [solo project]. Y con la residencia en colaboración con Intercambiador ACART de Maia Navas

Contamos con nuevas sedes: el Cinema Usera y un nuevo espacio coordinado por Daniel Silvo en Arturo Soria
.
Muchas gracias a todos los que se han presentado a la convocatoria y sobretodo a todos los creadores y amantes del videoarte.


SEDES
Cinema Usera, Primitiva Gañán, Madrid
El Patio de Martín de los Heros, Martín de los Heros, 15. Madrid
Espacio Labruc, La Palma, 18. Madrid

Espacio Naranjo, Naranjo, 33. Madrid
Espacio Oculto Madrid, Nicolás Usera, 27. Madrid
Espacio, Arturo Soria, Madrid
Intermediæ (Matadero), Paseo de la Chopera, 14, Madrid
La Noche Boca Arriba, Salitre, 30, Madrid
Quinta de Sordo, Rosario, 17, Madrid

Swinton Gallery
, Miguel Servet, 21
Theredoom
, Doctor Fourquet, 1-3, Madrid
Theredoom (solo project), Luisa Fernanda, 19, Madrid
Galeria Santa Clara, António Augusto Gonçalves 67, Coímbra, Portugal
[Box.] Videoart Project Space. Via F. Confalonieri, 11. Milán, Italia
Museo Belber Jiménez, Matamoros esquina Tinoco y Palacios. Oaxaca, México


I felt myself being invaded through and through. I crumbled, disintegrated, and only emptiness remained.

(Solaris by Stanisław Lem)

- Хари T E X T S -
Excerpts from the novel Solaris by Stanisław Lem
Poem by Arseni Tarkovski

- Хари V O I C E -
Melancholy Maaret

- Хари P E R F O R M A N C E -
Isabel Pérez del Pulgar

- Хари F O O T A G E -
Free Prelinger Archives
Images recorded in Andalusia and in Brittany by Isabel Pérez del Pulgar & Roland Quelven

- Хари V I D E O & S O U N D -
Roland Quelven

arad

arad

film poster

film poster
Monsieurs Quelven and Horkay and I invite you to the World Premiere of our new video/sound installation @ Szczecin European Film Festival, Poland, Autumn, 2014.

Félicitations, Cher Ami, Cher Icarus.



Merci à tous ceux qui ont vu l'exposition et la projection de ma collaboration, ΙΚΑΡΟΣ The Fall, avec le brillant artiste, Roland Quelven, au Festival International de Vidéoart (FIVA) en Argentine, et au Festival Vidéo Raymi, IV Muestra Internacional de Videoarte au Pérou.


Voir plus de son travail magique ici.


Thank you to all who attended the exhibition and screenings of ΙΚΑΡΟΣ The Fall, a collaboration between Roland Quelven and Melancholy Maaret, at the Festival International of Video Art (FIVA) in Argentina, and at the Video Raymi International Festival in Peru.


Please see more of Roland Quelven's magic here.


Recent viewings on our little tour of the world:


Exhibition at Galeria Texu in Oviedo, Spain.


Screening at the Fantadia Festival Internazionale di Multivisione, in Asolo, Italy.





Nimandsrose II
Video: Istvan Horkay
Voice and Text: Melancholy Maaret
Sound: Oleg Tishkovets and Melancholy Maaret

JENSEITS DES LUSTPRINZIPS

V O I C E S: Sigmund Freud & Melancholy Maaret
V I D E O: Istvan Horkay & Roland Quelven
S O U N D: Orlando de Quelves
F O O T A G E: Sydney Police Photographs dating from 1912 to 1948



Preview of a new collaboration with Istvan Horkay, on the heroic life of Raoul Wallenberg. The film premiered at the Kiscelli Muzeum, Budapest, 2014.

hello. melancholy maaret

hello. melancholy maaret

melacholy maaret berlin art basel

melacholy maaret berlin art basel

BELLATRIX: AUDRE LORDE






MOTHER, LOOSEN MY TONGUE OR 
ADORN ME WITH A LIGHTER BURDEN
— CALL, Audre Lorde, 1986

Don’t wait for inspiration. Remember. Do not wait for inspiration. You don’t need to be inspired, to write a poem. You need to reach down and touch the thing that’s boiling inside of you and make it somehow useful.
I’m finishing this piece of my bargain. And what I mean by that is: it doesn’t matter how long it takes to finish it. I don’t know. But that is the shape of where I am living and functioning, and then I’m going on to something else, the shape of which I have no idea. Only thing I know is, it’s going to be quite different. What I leave behind has a life of its own. I’ve said this about poetry, I’ve said it about children. Well, in a sense I’m saying it about the very artifact of who I have been.
I grew up in Manhattan, I grew up in New York, I was born here. My parents were West Indian. My father was from Barbados, my mother from Grenada, and we were always told when we were growing up, that home was somewhere else. So no matter how bad it got here, this was not our home, you see. And somewhere there was this magical place that if we really did right, someday we’d go back.I was born almost blind, ya hear. They didn’t pick that up. No one picked that up until I was about three years old; I was falling and so forth. But I observed the world in a very, very different way because the focus was about two inches away from my nose. So the things that were very, very close I saw very, very well and I saw nothing else out there.
When I wrote my first poem, I was in high school and I was a mess. I was a mess. I was introverted, hypersensitive, I was all of too intense. All of the words that other people used for little, wild Black girls who were determined to live.


AND WE WERE
NAPPY GIRLS QUICK AS CUTTLEFISH
SCURRYING FOR COVER
TRYING TO SPEAK TRYING TO SPEAK
TRYING TO SPEAK
THAT PAIN IN EACH OTHERS MOUTHS

— HARRIET, Audre Lorde, 1978

 I learned about sonnets by reading Edna St. Vincent Millay’s love sonnets and loving them and deciding I was going to try. I learned to write love poems by reading poems I never understood but the words would get me high. I remembered all of these particular things. I started writing because I had a need inside of me to create something that was not there.
I was editor of my high school magazine and I wrote a poem about love. And the student advisor, the faculty advisor said it was a bad sonnet. And I really knew that it was a good one. But I knew that she didn’t like it because of the things that I said in it. So I sent if off to Seventeen magazine and they bought it. And I made more money from that one poem than I made for the next ten years. 
Let me tell you first about what it was like being a Black woman poet in the ‘60s, from jump. It meant being invisible. It meant being really invisible. It meant being doubly invisible as a Black feminist woman and it meant being triply indivisible as a Black lesbian and feminist.
At this time, I was a young adult librarian doing work that I was very involved in. I loved library work, I had two children. I was coming out of what was essentially a three year depression, struggling to keep my writing going in the total absence of any kind of literary reflection. No one bought my poems. There were no readings. No one listened to them. I just wrote in isolation and raised my two children and warred with my husband who did not see in many respects what I was about but nonetheless was the only man I had ever met that I would even consider sharing life with.
In 1968 I was invited as poet in residence to Tugaloo College, which is a small Black college in Jackson Mississippi, and it changed my life. It changed my life. I had a chance to work with young Black poets in what was essentially a crisis situation. I mean white townspeople were shooting up the edges of Tugaloo at night. Many of the students had been arrested. It was siege situation. But I also needed to bring to it everything that I was. Because I had never spoken as a poet before, I had never spoken at all as a matter of fact. I had certainly never taught. But I knew that there was something urgent happening and there was something inside of me that could be shared with these young people and something they had to teach me. The six weeks that I spent at Tugaloo convinced me that I wanted to work with my poetry in other ways than hitherto I thought poetry was. That took care of me privately, and there was the other work that I did in the world. I was a librarian. I could get people to read. I could open up heads and touch feelings through other people’s words. I realized I could take my art in the realest way and make it do what I wanted. Not as propaganda, but as altering feelings and lives. And that in order to really, really do that—I had to be everything I was. I was married to a White man. I was in an interracial marriage at a time when certainly any kind of congress between Black and White people was anathema, a growing anathema within the Black community. I needed, for example, to have that be clear to the Black students I was working with at Tugaloo because it was a contradiction that they needed to be aware of as well as I. How did this become so integrated within me? So it was at that point that I began looking at using and bringing my poetry and my deepest held convictions together; and it’s a journey that I’m still on.
It was an incredible year. I just came back from Tugaloo. A week later, Martin Luther King was killed.

THE FIRST TIME I TOUCHED MY SISTER ALIVE
I WAS SURE THE EARTH TOOK NOTE
BUT WE WERE NOT NEW
FALSE SKIN PEELED OFF GLOVES OF FIRE
YOKED FLAME

I knew I could never go back only to libraries, that I needed to be involved in a much more active way. I began teaching soon after that.

I WAS
STRIPPED TO THE TIPS OF MY FINGERS
HER SONG WRITTEN INTO MY PALMS
MY NOSTRILS MY BELLY
WELCOME HOME
IN A LANGUAGE I WAS PLEASED TO RE-LEARN

I was immersed at this point in the Black Civil Rights movement and in the beginning women’s movement that was attempting to come together.
 One of the lessons I think that the ‘60s needs to teach us is that, liberation is not the private province of any one particular group; that Black people are not one big vat of homogenized chocolate milk, you know. We are individuals. We are particular people. And we have differences that we can use; that we need to recognize, identify and use in our common goals, in our common struggles. I don’t have to be you in order to work with you. I don’t have to be you to honor your Blackness.

SO WHEN THE SUN RISES, WE ARE AFRAID
IT MAY NOT REMAIN
WHEN THE SUN SETS WE ARE AFRAID
IT MIGHT NOT RISE IN THE MORNING
WHEN OUR STOMACHS ARE FULL WE ARE AFRAID
OF INDIGESTION
WHEN OUR STOMACHS ARE EMPTY WE ARE AFRAID
WE MAY NEVER EAT AGAIN
WHEN WE ARE LOVED WE ARE AFRAID
LOVE WILL VANISH
WHEN WE ARE ALONE WE ARE AFRAID
LOVE WILL NEVER RETURN
AND WHEN WE SPEAK WE ARE AFRAID
OUR WORDS WILL NOT BE HEARD
NOR WELCOMED
BUT WHEN WE ARE SILENT
WE ARE STILL AFRAID
SO IT IS BETTER TO SPEAK
REMEMBERING
WE WERE NEVER MEANT TO SURVIVE.


— A LITANY FOR SURVIVAL, Audre Lorde, 1978

(Taken from the documentary, A Litany of Survival: The Life and Work of Audre Lorde,by Ada Gay Griffin and Michelle Parkerson.) Please read: The Cancer Journals and The Collected Poems.